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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
it to their advantage in states like illinois. california is a whole different story where you have an independent commission drawing the lines there. it really will dramatically shape control of congress. >> i was simply going to make the point about illinois. the viewers don't think it's only the republicans who are redrawing districts. democrats did the exact same thing in illinois, and we'll see what the results are. sometimes they draw districts expecting a certain outcome and the voters surprise them. >> brown: while we're talking about the how, because earlier we talked about the senate in a kind of bigger picture. stu, remind us about the house situation. >> all 435 seats are up in the house but not all 435 are competitive. only about 70 or so are really worth watching for the chance of one party to steal a seat from the other party. the democrats need 25 seats in order toigate majority and presumably reinstall california, nancy pelosi as speaker be as she once was. that seems unlikely. the democrats have said we have enough seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington,
jersey as cokie pointed out but also places like california which are states that he would have won anyway but there was so much organic enthusiasm for barack obama in 2008 that he won -- that a lot of people turned out even in deep blue states where their votes, of course, didn't count, they turned out in mass numbers. the president's people knee this year that's not going to happen. so in terms of the overall national popular vote, if you think about red states and blue states where neither campaign is trying to turn out the vote, the blue states like california and new york for various reasons the president's numbers won't be anywhere near as strong as they were in 2008 whereas in the deep red state there is's so much antipathy towards the president that people will turn out in those states even though they are deep red states. they'll turn out the cast a symbolic vote against barack obama. so that's one thing that skews the popular vote by conceivably on election day towards romney more than people are necessarily expecting >> i think that's absolutely right. the red states are
want to bring up quickly california where there are a number of issues on the ballot. having to do with taxes. and a number of other topics. >> california is really ground zero for the initiative process. they tend to have more initiatives than any other state. they have 11 this year including two competing measures that would increase taxes in different ways to fund education and help balance the state budget. >> woodruff: we also know that health care is on the ballot. remind us where and what that would mean if those were to pass. >> sure. there are five states that have votes on the affordable care act this year. in missouri, it's bill that would prohibit the state from setting up a health insurance exchange. in the other four states it's a broader measure that attempts to block really implementation of the affordable care act. it sets up the right to have private insurance as a constitutional right in the state and prohibits the state from requiring anybody to buy insurance or penalizing anybody for failing to buy insurance. >> woodruff: and just quickly what are the polls sho
's its interaction of both of those things with voters. 1978 it was proposition 13 in california, which had to do with reducing state services, and an effort to reduce the size of government, and reduce taxes. that was two years before ronald reagan won the presidency. in a way it forshadowed that. but the most interesting thing about leadership is leadership can't come from the top. it has to be in response to people at the grass roots, and it's this interchange between the two that's so fascinating and works in the american system when it's working at its best. >> woodruff: we're seeing mark shield showing me there's a report in maryland, where they're still counting the votes, but it looks as if the gay marriage initiative there i? >> 51.5% for with 84% of the vote in. >> woodruff: we can also report-- and i'm reading this from the associated press wires, that even though-- well, whatever happens with paul ryan-- and it does appear he was not successful in his bid to become vice president-- he has been apparently re-elected as a congressman from the state of wisconsin. that's somethi
in california, even in hawaii, even in most liberal places have had chance to vote they said we want marriage to be between man and woman. the polling on this it always ends up being larger majority for those favoring traditional marriage on the actual election day than what the polls normally show. if it's a dead heat in places like maine right now, my guess is, marriage is going to win. >> remember when and if the supreme court gets this case it is likely to go off on constitutional grounds. think for a moment. whether you want to vote on most of what the constitution today allows or prohibits. i'm not surprised. particularly i'm not surprised because almost all of these referenda came on very early before you saw the transformation we now see in the voting public. they came on who put them on. those who were always against same sex marriage. the people are only catching up to them now, i concede that this is one of the great transformations, issues of all times. it's not going to happen in one fell swoop but it is happening. >> i just think the country is divided. it's a very sensitive and
and congressional races on the ballot in california. and older americans are working longer and returning to the workforce after retiring. you can help paul solman look into that demographic shift. if you're an older worker, fill out a questionnare on the rundown. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. jeff? >> brown: and again, to our honor roll of american service personnel killed in the afghanistan conflict. we add them as their deaths are made official and photographs become available. here, in silence, are eight more. >> brown: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks among others. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer producti
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)